Average Height Of A 15 Year Old Boy In Canada Style and Vision (What Makes One Photographer Different From Another?)

You are searching about Average Height Of A 15 Year Old Boy In Canada, today we will share with you article about Average Height Of A 15 Year Old Boy In Canada was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic Average Height Of A 15 Year Old Boy In Canada is useful to you.

Style and Vision (What Makes One Photographer Different From Another?)

In the artistic community, there is a lot of talk about style and how that style is often associated with some innate talent. The stylistic side is mostly true. Every artist, regardless of their specific discipline, brings their own voice and vision to their chosen art. What is inside the artist’s intellect is unique and independent of external training.

It would be convenient to immediately associate the photographer’s work with his own style. If only it were this easy, but unfortunately, it is not so transparent. In theory, most famous artists have inherent recognition; for example, in a room full of Impressionist paintings, one immediately knows which paintings are van Goth. Yes, but not always. The question is, are all of van Gogh’s paintings so unique that they will always be instantly recognisable, or have we been so exposed to them that we have already seen most of his works? My experience suggests the latter. Before anyone starts writing to me, think about it and maybe visit the van Gogh museum in Amsterdam in person.

Think of Pablo Picasso, his work is instantly recognisable, isn’t it? Well, maybe not… that’s only true through prior exposure to his paintings. If I remember correctly from my art history courses, his work is usually divided into 7 bodies or time periods. The first three are very different from the later sections. If you see representative examples of all seven periods together, one quickly recognizes distinctive transitions and minor elements that carry over thematically from one phase to the next. If you did not know or had never seen a selection of his works from all those periods, you would be hard pressed to identify them succinctly. The point is that both Picasso and van Gogh developed unique and distinctive styles over time. In this sense, the photographer is no different, maybe just a little more subtle. For the purpose of this essay, we keep “photographic” tricks and “darkroom” magic between minimal and intermediate levels. Extreme manipulations, although artistic, slide into the world of graphic art and many would say, lose their place as purely photographic art.

In photography we find the same kind of pseudo-recognition. When we examine Karsh’s portraits or Adams’ landscapes, they are often cited in the literature as distinctive and fundamentally unique to the photographer’s inherent style. Both are credited with creating truly iconic images that now have universal recognition. In this way, they share a common thread with the works of van Gogh and Picasso in their notoriety. However, I have seen portraits with every bit of Karsh’s style and vision, which are just as well done, but were done by others and predate Karsh, forcing the viewer to question the assumptions made. Now I am a big fan of Karsh and have been since I was a boy. In a room full of his work, such as can be found at the Chicago Art Institute, the style simply screams at you. Similarly, I took black and white photos of Half Dome in Yosemite and if you didn’t know better, it would be impossible to tell which was mine and which was Adam’s. I have not copied Adams in any way, except in general theme. I also have one of his famous paintings on my office wall. It hangs there as a sort of inspiration, a reminder if you will of what makes a great painting and a truly creative vision.

We photographers are often faced with a minor dilemma; we often know exactly what we want. This does not mean that we will have the right conditions for its creation. I’m talking about non-studio images here. The studio is another matter. Regardless of creativity, it is the control of conditions from within or the lack of control from without that makes the difference. You can go to the same place, at the same time of day, a thousand times and never fully reproduce the exact conditions of any previous encounter. It is a challenging situation that a photographer faces every time he picks up a camera. I believe that the way a photographer overcomes this challenge defines their personal style. The way our unique vision of the world interacts with the way the world is presented produces that personal style. I must warn the reader that the stylistic differences between many photographers are subtle and sometimes barely noticeable to the naked eye.

There are those who say that it can be learned and that talent is not needed. There are those who claim the opposite. There are others, myself among them, who say that learning hones innate talent. Each of us has a unique vision of the world and not everyone wants to express it, and even fewer want to express it through photography. None of us can ever be Karsh or Adams or any other famous or less famous photographers past or present. I often take photos with a fellow photographer. We stand side by side and use mostly the same equipment, but our images are different and although we recognize it immediately, most viewers would have a hard time telling who is whose. On the other hand, if we were to examine our body of work, the comparison reveals individual uniqueness in our signature styles.

Ultimately, both famous and anonymous photographers offer something worth learning. Wikipedia publishes a list of famous photographers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_photographers). I never miss a visit to any art museum or any collection of high quality paintings. I’d like to think I’ve developed one of those individual, instantly recognizable styles. I find it impossible to look at any photograph seriously and not learn something about the creation and presentation of the image.

My personal philosophy is very simple. I try to present my subject in the best possible way, considering the prevailing conditions. This is however very subjective and depends on the purpose, resulting in the occasional failure or lack of luster. When this happens, one of three things seem to have affected the goal: the lighting conditions were poor, or I lost clear focus on the subject and/or purpose, or I lacked the skills and necessary equipment to deliver the vision I set out to create . It is true that I am good at what I do and that I have a unique view of the world compared to others, but is it immediately recognizable? Why, not at all.

You can do what I did, continue to hone your individual skills and express your unique vision.

Dennis’ tips for discovering your unique visionary escape (in no particular order):

1. Focus on a topic: You can choose a few topics that you feel passionate about. If you know the subject, it is often easier to see beyond the superficial and bring out the deeper meaning and emotion. Not all themes carry deep emotion or have any truly deeper meaning, but that doesn’t mean they lack the challenge of making the mundane interesting. The most important thing is what gives you satisfaction and intellectual pleasure.

2. Style: Style is all about how you express your vision. It is a combination of methodology, technique and technology. This depends on: chosen technology, post-exposure processing, your approach, subject and conditions. It’s about making choices and maximizing results.

3. Learning: Be open to learning from others as well as from your own experiences. I never discard a bad picture without first scrutinizing it to see why it didn’t work. I guess I’m like most of you and only like about 10% of the total images I generate. Sometimes I don’t like any of them because they just fail to portray the theme properly. If possible, go back and try again, applying your knowledge of what went wrong until you capture the essence of your initial vision. Keep in mind the original purpose of making the images. It’s nice to paint a kid’s birthday party, and if some qualify as high art, all the better. If the purpose is to record an event for relatives, future nostalgia trips, or to embarrass a child later in adulthood, then high art is simply not necessary.

4. Rules: Rules in photography are not so much absolute as they are guidelines. Let’s face it, if we don’t put them aside from time to time, the originality would be lost. On average, the “rule of thirds” works, but when it comes to presenting a certain subject in the best possible way, at a certain moment, then maybe not. Simply put, experiment, try everything! Today, multimedia is so cheap that all other costs are higher. It is more expensive to travel even a short distance than to fill up your reusable flash card. Unlike the days of chemicals, film and paper that made us cautious and aware of the cost of each frame, today’s digital photos are inherently free and 100% recyclable.

5. Critic: You are your own worst critic, like any artist. The key is to be honest with yourself and others. We all know it, but most of the time we are more honest with others and less with ourselves. The best way is to look at all our pictures critically, but not despairingly. Apply a critical eye to which images work and which don’t, and make an honest assessment of why. A great picture of someone or something you hate is still a great picture. Understand why. You are not forced to show it to anyone else. If you find something that isn’t right, figure that out too. Back to studying, right?

6. Inspiration: We all need it. Some of us make it. Some of us inspire others. We are all inspired by someone or something. This is the kind of inspiration that turns the ordinary into the extraordinary. Make it work for you. I carry a pocket camera with me almost all the time because sometimes I find a unique moment and point and shoot. Not everyone is great. Most are plain, but every now and then I get inspired to go back with my SLR and do it right. We should all be open to the idea that inspiration occurs when and where we find it, or when and where it finds us. Once my wife and I were touring a 15th century cathedral and I was inspired to photograph the vaulted ceiling. I laid down on the floor and did just that, much to her embarrassment I must add, but the results were remarkable.

7. Practice: Don’t always wait for moments to find you, sometimes you have to start exploring with an active eye. Expect everything new, different and hopefully exciting. If there’s one thing I’ve learned living in Alberta, it’s that the prairies and mountains are never the same. You can travel the same path 100 times and easily get 500 different pictures! Practice is just as important in photography as it is in music or any other business. I am convinced that I have trained my eye to see what the lens sees. I know from experience that I can zoom in and stack an image two to three times faster than most. By the time I take the cover off the lens, I know what I’m going to shoot, at which focal length and from which position. I’d like to think this is raw talent; the truth is that it is 50 years of practice.

8. Self-expression: Why do we paint or create images? For me, it is my form of artistic expression. For others, they sing or play an instrument, draw, sketch or paint, while still others act or write. For me, photography is the most important self-expressive activity. If you choose photography as your medium of expression, you are also choosing to share your unique vision of the world with that world.

In the end, coincidence, pure and simple, often has the biggest impact on our work. What we make of those opportunities is what ultimately defines our individual vision of the world and culminates in the expression of our unique style. Most forms of self-expression are directed outward from ourselves to others. Some would say that photography is not just an expression of self, it expresses or even defines who we are. I think I’m still trying to define myself, so for me photography expresses what and who I am at any random point in time, although I’m not sure it ever captures any real totality of my existence. I often said, “I’ll grow up one day. When I do, I’ll let you know.” I strongly suspect that my epitaph will read something like this: “He always said he’d let us know when he grew up. He finally did.”

Video about Average Height Of A 15 Year Old Boy In Canada

You can see more content about Average Height Of A 15 Year Old Boy In Canada on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about Average Height Of A 15 Year Old Boy In Canada

If you have any questions about Average Height Of A 15 Year Old Boy In Canada, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article Average Height Of A 15 Year Old Boy In Canada was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article Average Height Of A 15 Year Old Boy In Canada helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles Average Height Of A 15 Year Old Boy In Canada

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 1535
Views: 32498012

Search keywords Average Height Of A 15 Year Old Boy In Canada

Average Height Of A 15 Year Old Boy In Canada
way Average Height Of A 15 Year Old Boy In Canada
tutorial Average Height Of A 15 Year Old Boy In Canada
Average Height Of A 15 Year Old Boy In Canada free
#Style #Vision #Photographer

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Style-and-Vision-(What-Makes-One-Photographer-Different-From-Another?)&id=6985374

Related Posts

default-image-feature

How To Deal With An Angry 9 Year Old Boy Is the Tone of Your Voice Distant Or Welcoming?

You are searching about How To Deal With An Angry 9 Year Old Boy, today we will share with you article about How To Deal With An…

default-image-feature

How To Deal With An Angry 15 Year Old Boy The "Art of Schmoozing"

You are searching about How To Deal With An Angry 15 Year Old Boy, today we will share with you article about How To Deal With An…

default-image-feature

Average Height Of A 12 Year Old Boy In India India’s Missing Children – Kidnapped, Forced into Prostitution or in Mafia-run Begging Gangs

You are searching about Average Height Of A 12 Year Old Boy In India, today we will share with you article about Average Height Of A 12…

default-image-feature

How To Deal With A Stubborn 7 Year Old Boy Zaneta’s Story (The Diamond T. Ranch, 1986)

You are searching about How To Deal With A Stubborn 7 Year Old Boy, today we will share with you article about How To Deal With A…

default-image-feature

How To Deal With A Stubborn 6 Year Old Boy 7 Common Parenting Mistakes That You Should Avoid

You are searching about How To Deal With A Stubborn 6 Year Old Boy, today we will share with you article about How To Deal With A…

default-image-feature

Average Height Of 2 And A Half Year Old Boy August Thoughts

You are searching about Average Height Of 2 And A Half Year Old Boy, today we will share with you article about Average Height Of 2 And…