How Do You Make For 9 Year Old Boys Rocet Creating and Maintaining Environments for Young People in Football

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Creating and Maintaining Environments for Young People in Football

Over the past four weeks (and I’ve been training for 18 years) I’ve noticed some very troubling environments. It is concerning to me as a coach, parent and independent observer that I have witnessed top level academies, secondary schools and primary schools being told “it gets better” all the time.

I have seen some good examples of well-intentioned people managing safety while giving young people ownership. It’s not easy to do. Another thing that is not easy to do is manage adrenaline and emotions. We all want our own children to do well. It goes without saying. Whether it’s homework, model making, swimming or soccer. But in which of the above are people changing their methods? How would an adult change their way of thinking?

The game is passionate – a fact. People visit stadiums, watch adults, complain about refereeing decisions and complain all week if our teams we support lose. To the point of becoming almost like Piers Morgan. However, there is a clear difference. The people you yell at, cheer for, and pity are really adults. I can handle adult environments under pressure. The best can even block and execute them. It takes years of practice. Playing in the Champions League for millions of pounds is one thing, playing in front of 30 people on a 5v5 astro turf pitch is quite another.

The two environments are not connected. They are not replicas. With their imagination, children will mentally try to visit and dream of such a stadium. That’s all the pressure they need.

We’re missing a big trick. The street and the playground where we commented and pretended to be Gazza or Maradona while playing were our pressure. The next defender is pressure. The last resort is pressure.

Additional pressure on young people is unfortunately:

· Getting kids to play in certain positions – most who have played will tell you – you won’t end up playing in the same position for very long.

· Yelling things like “don’t mess with it in your box, get rid of it, clean it up, add it, down the line” and so on. Things said in the last 4 weeks up to 25 times in one hour by one adult per 1-5 children. Confusion and pressure.

· Spectators shout “get him, dog-dog-dog, good in there.” it’s been done for years, I know I’ve played, but it doesn’t help.

· A parent yelling “get a hold of yourself” is also a motivation for increased aggression. Was the kid going to tackle anyway? Probably.

· Good players can’t play – they face youth team managers who go man for man, even 2 players tag them, but not led by kids, just so the adults can win.

· I have witnessed excessive fouling by young players who, instead of shaking hands and picking up children, were laughing because the “spin” became too emphatic. Just wait until the catch type starts playing at a good level (if they can do it without technique or skill – probably not), the catch will become a chase as players will dance around them and/or play through them.

Do you want your child to play and enjoy, be good and win at 15, 16 and later? I’m sure the answer is yes. Then you have to stop and think now. The 7-9 age groups are key to developing into good 16-year-olds:

· Freedom to try things – 1v1 moves without fear of losing the ball, playing from the goalkeeper and dribbling anywhere on the pitch.

· Remember that a 5v5 pitch is only a quarter of a full pitch. What they do in front of their goal, when they are older, they will do in the whole quarter. If they just clear the ball now, they won’t know any different.

· Results should not be recorded. Any league looking for results for U7-14 games is failing kids in my opinion. It makes adults film them and makes them cut corners on development. Makes no sense.

· Man of the Match Trophies and Awards – Rarely have I seen an award given for a good set of turns, skill and technical aspects. I hear a lot of “brave, worked hard and even… it’s on this week. what’s the point? Again an adult idea for some strange reason, not a child’s idea (newbie not infected).

· Don’t comment on kids who show up and make them pass – many skills are lost, not just player play – agility, acceleration and deceleration, movement, awareness, touch and use of both feet, use of different parts of the foot etc. not allowing dribbling and own decisions stop the entire sports development of children.

The best game environments I’ve seen are the following:

· Children arrive, shake hands with the coaches.

· Dressing room – random selection, age group matching, no birth bias, let kids pick their teams, dress up together if possible for social reasons

· A bit of talk from the coach – other than “have fun, be an exciting player, can you think about how to improve while you’re playing.”

· Without formation organization – let it happen. The children will take positions, but they know they can move anywhere on the field. I often hear “be defenders and don’t cross the halfway line”. You can say and don’t play.

· Never say things like “do the work or work hard” it’s not an obligation it’s a fun game

· Questions are only asked at intervals – what if? How could you? If this happens, what should we do? Scenario planning.

· Don’t say anything to them while playing the game. They will communicate anyway if they are allowed to. They will communicate like other 7-year-old children. In a way they understand. Saying things during a game is one of the worst things any coach or parent can do, increasing pressure, stifling creativity and decision-making, and ultimately panicking about results.

· Need a referee? Or just a manager who manages security? The latter is fine. If we encourage honesty and fair play and set nice guidelines, it works.

· Certain rules – allow dribbling, futsal passes – why do we encourage dribbling in young children? Mix it up.

· Parents’ comments – are they encouraging? If I’m a goalkeeper and I stop a certain goal-scoring opportunity, then I’ve just saved it. I am happy in myself the way I was. I already know or even anticipated it. So why do I need a chorus of “great save” because it probably wasn’t a great save, but my own achievement and that of my team. Debatable?

If you have 4 outfield players, instead of saying “let’s play 2 defenders, 1 midfielder and 1 forward”, ask the kids. They will come up with some wonderful concoctions and then they might start playing that way or start tracking the ball. The ball, you have to remember, is the real reason we play the game from a young age. That changes somewhat over time when we spend almost no time with him working on tactics as we get older and play at a higher level. There is absolutely nothing wrong with kids wanting a ball. There is nothing wrong with encouraging the dribble. He will lose the ball. Then it’s the next player’s turn. Too many of them stuff the pass and get rid of the ball down children’s throats. Let’s spot their techniques and then worry about winning later.

I’ve watched 4 weeks of games lately and I’ve yet to see a single kid playing in goal get off the line. Why don’t children learn the whole game? Again, the adults’ instructions are not about intelligence, but about more aggression and the spirit of Dunkirk.

Because of such frustration, one grandfather told his grandson to just lift him onto the field “it might as well be up there if they don’t score a goal.”

I’ve also seen an increase in wannabe match reporters. They also talk about results, victory and so on. I’m glad the team my son started playing for doesn’t promote this. The children do not know the result. After the match, they continue to play. They have secured social and psychological corners. They answer questions and behave nicely. They are playing. The opposing coach declared that his team won ‘again’ 11-7 (I think). He told his player because of course they didn’t know. He then proceeded to present the MOM award to the applause of the parents. Fortunately, my sons’ team continued to play each other to one goal and kept smiling. No one asked “why don’t we get a medal?” This particular game, regardless of the score, was full of “pass, pass, down the line”, but the goal was scored with a dribble that the player didn’t listen to. Good job, not really. “we won” said the coach; the other team shared equal playing time and sent out two better players who were not related to the result. They changed the goalkeeper 3 times. The children had fun. This information was not taken into account by the ‘coach’ because many live only from the end result and not from the process. They don’t see the potential of a 16-year-old.

I write this with great passion for the development of young players. I’ve seen some great kids thrive over the last 10 years and unfortunately I’ve seen some with great potential get ruined by coaches. Trainers that don’t really fit into children’s boots.

Contrast a smile with a serious face under pressure and I’ll know what I’d rather see.

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